China says upholds United Nations sanctions as North Korea trade rises

Vincent Carr
July 16, 2017

"If Trump were to give up on Chinese support in terms of containing North Korea, then there's a risk of increased trade tensions between the US and China, which could negatively impact China's overall export performance", said Julian Evans-Pritchard, China economist at Capital Economics.

Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi said during a news conference on Thursday that the North's missile test-firing could be a "roadshow" aimed at selling the weapons.

All coal imports from North Korea happened before Feb 18, and "this is a sign of China's implementing the UNSC resolutions", Huang said.

She added that all of the demonstrations of strength are really a roadshow for the North to sell some very unsafe technology to a rogue nation or lone wolf. The United States slapped an initial round of sanctions on Chinese firms who help prop up Pyongyang in late June - a departure from a traditionally cautious approach to ratcheting up pressure on North Korea's main source of support.

Such purchases are permitted under the sanctions and generate no revenue for nuclear development, said a foreign ministry spokesman, Geng Shuang.

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A spokesperson to the health ministry, Boade Akinola, however said the ministry was not yet in receipt of the house resolution. There is also emerging report that the committee investigating Yusuf has received more petitions against him.

US President Donald Trump claimed in a tweet this month that China-North Korea trade in the first quarter "grew nearly 40 percent". "So much for China working with us - but we had to give it a try!"

China has always been the North's main diplomatic defender but increasingly expresses frustration with leader Kim Jong Un's provocative behavior.

The US measures would initially hit Chinese entities considered "low-hanging fruit", including smaller financial institutions and "shell" companies linked to North Korea's nuclear and missile programs, said one of the officials, while declining to name the targets. He called out the "nearly 40%" increase in trade in the first three months of the year on Twitter last week.

Huang Songping, spokesman of General Administration of Customs, said on Thursday at a Beijing news conference that China's total imports from the DPRK amounted to US$880 million in the first six months of this year, a year-on-year drop of 13.2 percent. "Trade related to the people's livelihood in the North Korea, especially those that embody humanitarian principles, should not be affected by sanctions".

But Beijing, as it has in the past, largely resisted Trump's demands.

Other reports by BadHub

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